House of Earth and Blood by Sarah J. Maas

#1 New York Times bestselling author Sarah J. Maas launches her brand-new CRESCENT CITY series with House of Earth and Blood: the story of half-Fae and half-human Bryce Quinlan as she seeks revenge in a contemporary fantasy world of magic, danger, and searing romance.

Bryce Quinlan had the perfect life—working hard all day and partying all night—until a demon murdered her closest friends, leaving her bereft, wounded, and alone. When the accused is behind bars but the crimes start up again, Bryce finds herself at the heart of the investigation. She’ll do whatever it takes to avenge their deaths.

Hunt Athalar is a notorious Fallen angel, now enslaved to the Archangels he once attempted to overthrow. His brutal skills and incredible strength have been set to one purpose—to assassinate his boss’s enemies, no questions asked. But with a demon wreaking havoc in the city, he’s offered an irresistible deal: help Bryce find the murderer, and his freedom will be within reach.

As Bryce and Hunt dig deep into Crescent City’s underbelly, they discover a dark power that threatens everything and everyone they hold dear, and they find, in each other, a blazing passion—one that could set them both free, if they’d only let it.

  • File Name:house-of-earth-and-blood-by-sarah-j-maas.epub
  • Original Title:House of Earth and Blood (Crescent City)
  • Creator:
  • Language:en
  • Identifier:ISBN:9781635574043
  • Publisher:Bloomsbury Publishing
  • Date:2020-03-02T18:30:00+00:00
  • File Size:891.092 KB

Table of Content

  • 1. Half Title
  • 2. Dedication
  • 3. Books by Sarah J. Maas
  • 4. Title Page
  • 5. Contents
  • 6. Map
  • 7. The Four Houses of Midgard
  • 8. Part I: The Hollow
    • Chapter One
    • Chapter Two
    • Chapter Three
    • Chapter Four
    • Chapter Five
    • Chapter Six
    • Chapter Seven
  • 9. Part II: The Trench
    • Chapter Eight
    • Chapter Nine
    • Chapter Ten
    • Chapter Eleven
    • Chapter Twelve
    • Chapter Thirteen
    • Chapter Fourteen
    • Chapter Fifteen
    • Chapter Sixteen
    • Chapter Seventeen
    • Chapter Eighteen
    • Chapter Nineteen
    • Chapter Twenty
    • Chapter Twenty-One
    • Chapter Twenty-Two
    • Chapter Twenty-Three
    • Chapter Twenty-Four
    • Chapter Twenty-Five
    • Chapter Twenty-Six
    • Chapter Twenty-Seven
    • Chapter Twenty-Eight
    • Chapter Twenty-Nine
    • Chapter Thirty
    • Chapter Thirty-One
    • Chapter Thirty-Two
    • Chapter Thirty-Three
    • Chapter Thirty-Four
    • Chapter Thirty-Five
    • Chapter Thirty-Six
    • Chapter Thirty-Seven
  • 10. Part III: The Canyon
    • Chapter Thirty-Eight
    • Chapter Thirty-Nine
    • Chapter Forty
    • Chapter Forty-One
    • Chapter Forty-Two
    • Chapter Forty-Three
    • Chapter Forty-Four
    • Chapter Forty-Five
    • Chapter Forty-Six
    • Chapter Forty-Seven
    • Chapter Forty-Eight
    • Chapter Forty-Nine
    • Chapter Fifty
    • Chapter Fifty-One
    • Chapter Fifty-Two
    • Chapter Fifty-Three
    • Chapter Fifty-Four
    • Chapter Fifty-Five
    • Chapter Fifty-Six
    • Chapter Fifty-Seven
    • Chapter Fifty-Eight
    • Chapter Fifty-Nine
    • Chapter Sixty
    • Chapter Sixty-One
    • Chapter Sixty-Two
    • Chapter Sixty-Three
    • Chapter Sixty-Four
    • Chapter Sixty-Five
    • Chapter Sixty-Six
    • Chapter Sixty-Seven
  • 11. Part IV: The Ravine
    • Chapter Sixty-Eight
    • Chapter Sixty-Nine
    • Chapter Seventy
    • Chapter Seventy-One
    • Chapter Seventy-Two
    • Chapter Seventy-Three
    • Chapter Seventy-Four
    • Chapter Seventy-Five
    • Chapter Seventy-Six
    • Chapter Seventy-Seven
    • Chapter Seventy-Eight
    • Chapter Seventy-Nine
    • Chapter Eighty
    • Chapter Eighty-One
    • Chapter Eighty-Two
    • Chapter Eighty-Three
    • Chapter Eighty-Four
    • Chapter Eighty-Five
    • Chapter Eighty-Six
    • Chapter Eighty-Seven
    • Chapter Eighty-Eight
    • Chapter Eighty-Nine
    • Chapter Ninety
    • Chapter Ninety-One
    • Chapter Ninety-Two
    • Chapter Ninety-Three
    • Chapter Ninety-Four
    • Chapter Ninety-Five
    • Chapter Ninety-Six
    • Chapter Ninety-Seven
  • 12. Epilogue
  • 13. Acknowledgments
  • 14. Copyright
23 comments
Comment author placeholder
Amrin Jenny
Amrin Jenny

I liked it, I wouldn't say I LOVED it the way I did with TOG but I did like it. The lack of background information did throw me off many times and I suspect that I'll have to reread the book again to make sense of certain things.

I also wish there was a bit more structure, the swift change of perspective did confuse me at times. I do think that if- I'm not saying that S.J.M didn't extensively plan this -but some parts of the story seemed rushed when, with a bit more care, could have filled out the book and given more depth to the characters and the story its self. I will admit that I did enjoy some parts of the story, and I'm proud that one of my favorite authors were able to type out another series for fans the she must deeply care about.

Reply2 days ago
    naima noor
    naima noor

    Has everyone here forgotten that this book is FICTION? seriously everyone has different taste and that fine but that doesn't mean you have to bring someone's opinion down.end of

    Reply4 days ago
      Sierra :P
      Sierra :P

      Yes, yes, it's completely normal for an author selling thousands of books to write about people having sex in the sky - something not even the worst of the erotica authors on epub do.

      Sejal More liked the book, and he/she left it at that instead of attacking anyone else. If you don't agree with a person's goddamn opinions, why should other people give a fuck about yours? Just stop commenting.

      Reply7 days ago
        Becky Robertson
        Becky Robertson

        I can agree with people writing whatever the hell they damn well want. People like different things. That's life. End of.

        Reply7 days ago
          Galian  O_O
          Galian O_O

          R u accepting that this book has questionable shit then? mindful authors dont have shit like this woman writes in their books. I've read plenty, i know. i didnt care about u reading some random author's books until i read her book acofas and now im scarred for life. apparently even fans are bc i saw that many stans had posted rant videos.

          enough with the arguing becky. if u enjoyed the book, then leave it there. stop trying to defend this woman when shes clearly written so much stupid shit. u cant possible agree with people having SEX IN THE GODDAMN SKY.

          Reply7 days ago
            Becky Robertson
            Becky Robertson

            It's just sick. People used to go, oh this book wasn't for me, I didn't like some aspects but you might. Now it's all about looking for problems in things. Art is subjective, just because you have a "problem" with something doesn't mean everyone else will. People view things differently that's the point. There isn't one way of thinking, people can form their own opinion on a piece of fiction not be told they have to find something "problematic". Others won't view it that way.

            Reply8 days ago
            • Becky Robertson

              What book doesn't have questionable shit? Depending on who you're asking. 😕

              8 days ago
            • Galian O_O

              yo, calm down. i've been watching the comment section for a long time now, and it's clear that you'r simply ignoring whatever those ppl r saying. they just said u can enjoy whatev u want to enjoy & r simply saying theres some questionable shit in the book.

              8 days ago
            James the Reader
            James the Reader

            I'm still reading the book, but i can actually see some of the stuff being pointed out. Also, you can't ignore that while all of Bardugo's books are being adapted, Maas's aren't.

            Reply8 days ago
              James the Reader
              James the Reader

              Dude, Becky, they both just said they aren't jobless enough to look for problems in books and that they tried to like it while reading. they've made valid points but you're refusing to admit it and repeating the same old arguments despite Cress even clarifying everything. chill out.

              Reply8 days ago
                Becky Robertson
                Becky Robertson

                Ok well, all you people ever do is look for problems in things. Because apparently writing what you love is problematic. Really sick to death of the bullying and mob attacks on YA Twitter. No author is ever good enough apparently. I've seen people have their books pulled from publication thanks to having a mob go after them calling them "problematic". If that's not censorship I don't know what is. Fiction is fiction, you might not like it or condone it in the real world but that doesn't mean it isn't "allowed" to be written. The whole point of fiction is to explore things you wouldn't in real life. I weren't aware there were rules for writing. Jeez, what book isn't deemed problematic now. This is becoming a joke.

                Reply8 days ago
                  Lia Aubrey
                  Lia Aubrey

                  Becky Robertson, Cress is right. this book & the author is problematic. you're also not acknowledging some of the best points she made.

                  ppl dislike Sarah's works for valid reasons. no one's jobless enough to randomly go 'hating' on an author. why would anyone want to do that? also Bardugo is actually an amazing writer, but I can understand if you don't like her. but her books are not problematic. it's why, as Cress pointed out, her Grishaverse books are being adapted into a Netflix series and her other book Ninth House is being developed by Amazon for a tv show. but while Sarah's book rights have been sold, the producers aren't showing much interest in adapting it because of problematic content. my husband's bff is bestselling author and he also says that if Sarah had tried to sell this novel as debut novelist, no one would have published bc of problematic content.

                  Reply9 days ago
                    Lia Aubrey
                    Lia Aubrey

                    Becky Robertson, Cress is right. this book & the author is problematic. you're also not acknowledging some of the best points she made.

                    ppl dislike Sarah's works for valid reasons. no one's jobless enough to randomly go 'hating' on an author. why would anyone want to do that? also Bardugo is actually an amazing writer, but I can understand if you don't like her. but her books are not problematic. it's why, as Cress pointed out, her Grishaverse books are being adapted into a Netflix series and her other book Ninth House is being developed by Amazon for a tv show. but while Sarah's book rights have been sold, the producers aren't showing much interest in adapting it because of problematic content. my husband's bff is bestselling author and he also says that if Sarah had tried to sell this novel as debut novelist, no one would have published bc of problematic content.

                    Reply9 days ago
                      Lia Aubrey
                      Lia Aubrey

                      Becky Robertson, Cress is right. this book & the author is problematic. you're also not acknowledging some of the best points she made.

                      ppl dislike Sarah's works for valid reasons. no one's jobless enough to randomly go 'hating' on an author. why would anyone want to do that? also Bardugo is actually an amazing writer, but I can understand if you don't like her. but her books are not problematic. it's why, as Cress pointed out, her Grishaverse books are being adapted into a Netflix series and her other book Ninth House is being developed by Amazon for a tv show. but while Sarah's book rights have been sold, the producers aren't showing much interest in adapting it because of problematic content. my husband's bff is bestselling author and he also says that if Sarah had tried to sell this novel as debut novelist, no one would have published bc of problematic content.

                      Reply9 days ago
                        Cress R
                        Cress R

                        @Becky I was trying to be respectful, but since you're personally attacking me now. Let me answer each of your questions and clarify every single statement you've made.

                        • I'm not pro-censorship. Not at all. Instead, I'd prefer for the publisher/author to be more mindful of what they write.

                        • Reading is for entertainment and it's exactly what I stated.

                        • I don't want to preached at. Heck, I doubt anyone does. The beauty of adult literature is that opens our eyes to issues we didn't existed and deals with them subtly.

                        • Having an imagination is not problematic. LOL, I'm a writer myself who finished top of her class in literature. Believe me, in the past books have been banned/attacked for less. I'm also not saying the worldbuilding is problematic. How the f*ck can world building be problematic? You also chose only to respond to the negative aspects that I highlighted. I liked SJM's world building in the beginning, despite the info-dumping - but as a writer myself, I can't look past the redundancy of some of it. It also made some situations unnecessarily complicated, and wasn't handled very well near the end.

                        • When did I say that having a redemption arc is problematic? I'm saying that the backstories were handled well in the beginning - and, like the world building, weren't handled very well towards the end making them seem more like piss-poor sob stories than anything else. You know just how much Hunt was affected by his love's death - a more proficient writer would have let his lover's killer stay alive longer so that it would force him to confront his trauma and lead to greater character development.

                        • YES, WRITING ABOUT PEOPLE WHO LOOK COMPLETELY FLAWLESS IS PROBLEMATIC. I know girls - AND BOYS - who feel insecure when they watch commercials/tv shows with perfectly shaped actors. Same goes for when they read books about it. This issue has actually became a reason for INTERNATIONAL CONCERN - so much that people promoting body positivity/neutrality have been gaining a lot of traction recently. PEOPLE CAN LOOK GOOD - I HAVE NOTHING AGAINST THAT. BUT IF YOU'VE READ THE BOOK PROPERLY, YOU'LL REALISE THAT ALL THE "GOOD" FEMALE CHARACTERS ARE CURVY WHILE THE ONES WHO OPPOSE BRYCE'S OPINIONS ARE NOT DESCRIBED AS SUCH. THIS GIVES THE IMPRESSION THAT ONLY 'GOOD' WOMEN ARE CURVY. Do you believe in that?

                        • Yes, there is plenty that isn't problematic. Danika and Bryce's relationship is absolutely NOT PROBLEMATIC. I can point out more, but :P

                        • You're wondering why I didn't put the book down when it became clear that I didn't like it. THAT'S BECAUSE I'VE LOVED SJM's ToG BOOKS AND I WAS DESPERATE TO LOVE THIS ONE TOO, HOPING SHE WOULD PULL THROUGH AT LEAST IN THE END. Sadly, it didn't happen.

                        • LOL, THIS BOOK was the most bland and vanilla story I ever read that's been called "adult". A book, at least in the writing community, is called that when it doesn't have:

                        1. graphic violence in a supposedly violent world
                        2. real stakes (fine, SJM had stakes, but I couldn't bring myself to care)
                        3. real world problems
                        4. culture described so well that you can practically taste it, ESPECIALLY IN HIGH FANTASY. ex: GRRM
                        5. etc, I'm not here to take a writing class.
                        • SJM can write what she wants as she pleases. But since she's an author who's sold millions of books, she should be mindful of the problematic content she's putting in her books - which will be read by millions. Ex: One of the milder edits could've been including more female companionship for Bryce, or simply had her so-called friends interact with her more. In real life, do you or do you not have more female friends than male friends? Also, none of the men Bryce's life go a page or two without stepping in to try and protect her despite her repeatedly saying she can handle herself. They act exactly like the alpha holes she supposedly hates so much.

                        • LOL, again, NO BANNING OR BURNING books. I love all of my books, and all the books in the world. They're just too precious and good for the world and should be protected at all costs.

                        • Think within the box? WTH? The only restraining factor in publishing is that you shouldn't publish problematic content. SJM WASN'T DOING THIS BEFORE - and her publisher was okay with it. By the time she began writing problematic content, she already had an established fan base - and was selling a lot of books. The problematic content made several fans leave her fanbase - but she was still selling enough books that her publisher allowed her to continue it. KEEP IN MIND THAT IF THIS HAD BEEN A DEBUT NOVEL, IT WOULDN'T HAVE BEEN PUBLISHED. A FRIEND WHO WORKS IN THE PUBLISHING INDUSTRY CLARIFIED IT - JUST SO YOU KNOW.

                        • What's literary snobbery?

                        • Yes, GRRM's books are problematic. I'm not saying that they aren't. BUT IT'S BEEN ACKNOWLEDGED EVEN BY HIS FANBASE - which is NOT THE CASE IN THE SJM FANBASE.

                        • NO, you will NOT find problematic content in Bardugo's books. The only criticism her first trilogy has drawn is that it should have been more diverse (which she rectified by making her following books diverse, while SJM has refused to do that in every single book she's every written). Let's be honest - you don't find SJM problematic. Then how will you find Bardugo problematic when NETFLIX hasn't? SJM's problematic content is why NONE OF HER BOOKS HAVE BEEN ADAPTED FOR TV/MOVIE DESPITE SELLING MILLIONS OF BOOKS. Also, have you actually read one of Bardugo's books?

                        • Yes, fiction can be whatever it wants to be. You can write about space aliens on the hunt for a magical banana that will save their race, and it's still fiction.

                        • Um, I don't need help telling fiction apart from reality. I want a fiction so immersive, so realistic that I want IT TO BECOME MY REALITY. This happened partly with SJM's ToG series.

                        • I love morale grey characters and I've read over 500 books in just the past three years, so you can bet that I've read plenty of morally grey characters. In fact, one of the protagonists in one of my WIPs is a criminal who toes the line between good and evil.

                        • LOL, I'm no snowflake. I watched GoT when I was 15, and I'm an avid fan of horror movies. I write graphic sex and violence. Yep, definitely no snowflake.

                        • Books be too pure for this world. No burning of books - not even the book you're defending as if your life depends on it. All of this began as you commenting, quite rudely about the "reader below me" just because I left some thoughts I had about the book that I couldn't shake off.

                        Anyway, I think this is going to be my last comment. I was hoping for a respectful discussion, but I don't think that's going to happen. Just ponder over why SJM has drawn so much criticism over the years - people are not jobless (if you're a new SJM reader, you won't know that she's been mostly alienated even by the author community for the problematic content in her books).

                        If you refuse to believe my take on this matter, at least visit this page reviewing House of Earth and Blood. I think you might actually like the review, despite refusing to accept the points that I'm making or acknowledging any of the good arguments I made in my previous comment.

                        https://www.tor.com/2020/03/05/book-reviews-sarah-j-maas-house-of-earth-and-blood/

                        Reply9 days ago
                          Becky Robertson
                          Becky Robertson

                          Wow, we really do have a pro-censorship reader here. Reading is for entertainment and this series is adult. Maybe some readers want to be preached at but a lot of people read for an escape. You don't have to deal with real world issues in a book. I wasn't aware that having an imagination is problematic. So apparently writing about good looking people or writing a redemption arc is problematic now. Not liking the world building makes it problematic. Having a character that's a really good shot is problematic. Wow. It seems you can't write anything anymore without being attacked. Is there anything that isn't problematic anymore? I actually wonder what fiction will be like in the future, only the most bland and vanilla stories allowed to publish. There are plenty of stories where I haven't liked the characters or agreed with the content, I put the book down and read something else. No book works for everyone. I certainly didn't start having a go at the author for writing what they love. Let's start banning and burning books shall we. If this author doesn't think within the box, they're not allowed to publish. With that attitude, thousands of books wouldn't exist. I think she's a fantastic author, I don't expect everyone to agree with me but this seems like literary snobbery to me. As for GRRM, plenty of people have issues with his books as I'm sure I could find issues with Bardugo's books or heck, any book in existence if I put my mind to it. For the record, I'm not a fan of Bardugo's work but I certainly won't begrudge anyone who is. Fiction is fiction. People can write their characters and stories however they want. If you can't tell the difference between fiction and reality, you need help. No one in their right mind is going to copy behaviour they read in a made up story. What next? You can't write books with morally grey characters or any violence? Really tired of this snowflake attitude now. Let the book burnings commence, hey?

                          Reply9 days ago
                            Cress R
                            Cress R

                            Anyway, it's perfectly fine for readers to read and enjoy the book. I get it - we all need some escapism especially with what's going on right now. All I'm asking is for you to acknowledge some the really problematic aspects of the book that might seem trivial to you - I was once a fan who refused to acknowledge it for THREE FRICKIN YEARS, until I really forced myself to understand the impact that her books might cause on some immature/insecure/unaware readers.

                            Reply10 days ago
                              Cress R
                              Cress R

                              @Becky Robertson I'm not asking anyone to abstain from reading the book - just highlighting the various issues I had with it. I'm sorry if I wasn't clear about that. You have a right to enjoy whatever you read, as does anyone else.

                              All I'm trying to highlight is that SJM is selling problematic content in her book that young people not so aware about it might try to emulate. Fiction can sell whatever it wants, but it CANNOT SELL problematic things like the following:

                              1. Bryce is the only notable female protagonist apart from the Witch Queen who plays a very minor role. 2. Every female character except the good ones are slut-shamed (non-explicitly). Anyone who does not support Bryce is automatically not a good female character. On the same note, despicable male characters are easily forgiven/let off easily. Ex: Sabine is just as terrible as the Autumn king, but while SPOILER she gets killed and SJM goes out of her way to justify it SPOILER the Autumn king actually seems to be redeemed at least partially by the end of the book - which is unacceptable since he basically assaulted Bryce's mother.
                              2. Bryce has curvy boobs and a curvy ass. Also, never met a woman so perfect that most of her weight constituted of "muscle" (actually mentioned in the book) and has silken thighs. Every male character is also perfectly built. Name ONE male character who's not powerfully built - I dare you.
                              3. Adult literature is meant to deal with real world problems and highlight them. It's supposed to have complex characters. But SJM actually had good characters in her ToG series but fell totally flat here. Here is where I can also highlight how instead of writing about fantastical perfect beings, she's supposed to write about young women facing challenges like, maybe, eating disorders, gender inequality etc but fails to do all of that. (I do acknowledge that she did a decent job of pointing out that "party girls" have self-worth and unique identities too. It was well done in the beginning but that too became overdone in the end).
                              4. The worldbuilding turned out to be mostly useless. Tell me how it affected the plot to have the four houses - or not have them. It simply created more confusion what with the infodumping and all.
                              5. Tell me you don't think Hunt was just a mashup of Rowan (tragic love story) and Rhys (serving people who hurt him). Or that you didn't think he was possessive or creepy. If a guy you didn't know were ordered to stand guard outside your window, would you open the curtains just so that he could watch you? Doesn't that seem a little excessive?
                              6. Were there any hints of Bryce going to shooting classes/having good aim before she went to the shooting arena and shot those three perfect shots THAT NOT EVEN THE FAE DECADES OLDER THAN HER COULD MANAGE? Seem a little excessive just yet?

                              There are several hundred more problems I could highlight, but I'll leave it at that. Keep in mind that I BEGAN READING HOUSE OF EARTH AND BLOOD BECAUSE I LOVED HER ToG BOOKS AND NOT TO HATE ON HER. after I finished this book, though, I was left with a really sour taste in my mouth.

                              Do you really think SJM's books compare to adult writers like Stephen King and GRR Martin, Nora Roberts and Sidney Sheldon?

                              Even Leigh Bardugo (also YA author), whose adult debut Ninth House came last year? It was a stunning book. Highly rec - take the advice as if I were a friend. I promise you'll love it. At the same time, head out and read Six of Crows by Leigh, too. There's even a NETFLIX show coming later this year, and it's a fantastic duology.

                              Reply10 days ago
                                sejal More
                                sejal More

                                Its an awesome story

                                Reply10 days ago
                                  sejal More
                                  sejal More

                                  Check out brayshaw series by meagan brandy!!!

                                  Reply10 days ago
                                    Becky Robertson
                                    Becky Robertson

                                    Brilliant story. I for one will be getting myself a physical copy of the book. If the commenter below me finds the story "problematic", read something else. It's FICTION. Last I checked having an imagination isn't a crime. Get a life.

                                    Reply10 days ago
                                    • rownan whitethorne

                                      hey...con you send me the pdf...that is , if u have it

                                      10 days ago
                                    Cress R
                                    Cress R

                                    Anyway, did anyone get the significance of the Raven on the cover? I didn't. But that's probably because I was reading it so fast to just finished the gods damned book

                                    Reply10 days ago
                                      Cress R
                                      Cress R

                                      Hella problematic, cheesy, boring. SJM writes about Bryce hating alphaholes so much yet Hunt and generally every other male character acts like one. Bryce is such a "perfect" woman with "very large boobs" and a "large ass". She literally had no flaws. Oh - and it eventually turns out that she's a special snowflake after all.

                                      The romance was poorly done and relied on the characters' sexual interests regarding each other with a sprinkle of tragic stories to make us think it somehow justified their being together.

                                      As usual, piss-poor representation of diversity and sexualities.

                                      The villain is one dimensional and has a classic monologue. A very painful, long monologue.

                                      Also, WTF was that climax? Why was everyone just watching as Bryce did all the heroic stuff? I thought they were the most powerful beings in Crescent City. Way to go, breaking rules of common sense.

                                      THAT BEING SAID I did LOVE Bryce and Danika's relationship. The only thing about the book that seemed remotely interesting and made me feel emotional.

                                      I loved the first 5 books in ToG (except the problematic territorial fae bullshit), but this is easily the worst book SJM can possibly write, and has possibly ever written. She had wonderful worldbuilding at her fingertips, but she squandered the opportunity to make it something special by infodumping and not handling it well in the later stage of the books.

                                      P.S. Also, WTF of a character is Sabine? SJM has tried too hard to make her a gray character and it shows.

                                      Reply10 days ago
                                        Malya Rose
                                        Malya Rose

                                        Me too

                                        Reply13 days ago
                                          anum zaidi
                                          anum zaidi

                                          Wow!! Love this book!

                                          Reply13 days ago